Category Archives: April 2015

April 2015

This is a copy of the issue in its entirety, therefore a relatively large file. Please be patient while it loads. It’s worth the wait!
This is a copy of the issue in its entirety, therefore a relatively large file. Please be patient while it loads. It’s worth the wait!

Editor’s Letter

Screen Shot 2015-10-27 at 5.59.38 PM“…it seemed a part of her life, to step from the ancient to the modern, back and forth. She felt rather sorry for those who knew only one and not the other. It was better, she thought, to be able to select from the whole menu of human achievements than to be bound within one narrow range.” ― Orson Scott Card, Children of the Mind

My first experiences with ruins in Mexico were memorable, although if I am honest, they left me feeling underwhelmed. It’s not because I didn’t find them interesting or beautiful, but they seemed to bring me to a time so distant that I found it a challenge to connect. I even used to joke that I was ‘ruined for ruins’. However, I could not have been more wrong. Traces of the existence of their inhabitants co-exist in our modern world, if you just know where to look. Continue reading Editor’s Letter

Poetry in the Clouds

By Leigh Morrow

Thousands of years ago, the people who lived in the forested slopes and valleys of the Sierra Madre del Sur, where fog lingers on the tops of trees, and corn is communally planted, spoke in a language that rose and fell like music. Today they still do. The Zapotec language, the oldest written language in America, comprises of 50 different dialects that together have almost as many varieties as there are pueblos in which it is spoken. Some half a million people speak Zapoteco, most living in the states of Oaxaca and Veracruz, usually speaking one or two varieties of their native language along with Spanish. In some areas, this native language is used in all daily communication such as commerce, religion and literature, but in other areas, the Zapotec language is on the brink of extinction. Continue reading Poetry in the Clouds

The Eye Lecture Series

On March 3rd The Eye launched the Lecture Series with a presentation from Ben Levine and Julia Schulz whose work was explored in the September 2012 article by Deborah Van Hoewyk.

Dear Friends of The Eye:

We really enjoyed our presentation on March 3 at the Mansiones Cruz del Mar Theater in Huatulco. It was a treat to talk to such a varied group about our work documenting and saving endangered languages; the conversation was one of the most stimulating we have ever had at a presentation. Continue reading The Eye Lecture Series

Pre-Hispanic Residents of Huatulco

By Jan Chaiken and Marcia Chaiken

Screen Shot 2015-11-02 at 3.50.24 PMOn October 5, 2010, Huatulco’s Eco-archeology park opened to the east of Tangolunda Bay near Copalita. It provides a unique experience of pre-Columbian life on the Oaxacan Coast as it existed well before the Spanish conquest of Mexico. The park, located just past the turnoff for Playa La Bocana, consists of over 81 hectares (200 acres), including a museum and trails leading to recently excavated archeological sites, primarily undisturbed conservation areas, and magnificent views of the coastline. Developed by FONATUR (the Mexican government foundation for promoting tourism) and INAH (National Institute of Anthropology and History), the park offers residents and tourists alike an informative and visually inspiring experience. Continue reading Pre-Hispanic Residents of Huatulco

What’s On In Mexico City? Semana Santa…And Beyond

By Carole Reedy

Here in Mexico, the two most important weeks of the year take place in the weeks surrounding Easter, with the Christmas holidays a close second. It’s really no surprise since 90 percent of the population is Catholic. During these Easter weeks, the city’s residents pack up their cars or head to the bus stations or airport in anticipation of a well-deserved rest at one of the many beaches that hug the Mexican coastline. It’s an opportune time to explore Mexico City since traffic is more manageable, with fewer people on the streets, work hours reduced, and schools closed. Beware, though, of the highways entering and leaving the city as they will be full of escaping Chilangos. Continue reading What’s On In Mexico City? Semana Santa…And Beyond

What’s On In Mexico City? Semana Santa…And Beyond

By Carole Reedy

Here in Mexico, the two most important weeks of the year take place in the weeks surrounding Easter, with the Christmas holidays a close second. It’s really no surprise since 90 percent of the population is Catholic. During these Easter weeks, the city’s residents pack up their cars or head to the bus stations or airport in anticipation of a well-deserved rest at one of the many beaches that hug the Mexican coastline. It’s an opportune time to explore Mexico City since traffic is more manageable, with fewer people on the streets, work hours reduced, and schools closed. Beware, though, of the highways entering and leaving the city as they will be full of escaping Chilangos. Continue reading What’s On In Mexico City? Semana Santa…And Beyond

Zapotec: Language and Perspective

By Julie Etra

Living here on the Oaxacan coast, we native English speakers forget that Spanish was not the native language here (in fact there are 16 distinct languages in the State of Oaxaca). Although we have absorbed so many Native American words in the USA and Canada daily vocabulary, like cars, bridges, highways and athletic teams, it is a bit different here (from my perspective). Many pre-Colombian languages in Oaxaca are still spoken, and Zapotec words are found in daily culture in and around Huatulco, such as the names of restaurants like Itoó (come and eat) and hotels like Binniguenda (actually Binni guenda, two words, and means Shaman, a live soul, or ancient people), etc. At Hagia Sofia, the lovely gardens on the way to Pluma Hidalgo, the plants are labeled with scientific, Spanish (Mexican) common, and Zapotec names. Continue reading Zapotec: Language and Perspective

Pedal South

Screen Shot 2015-11-02 at 3.50.45 PMBy Kary Vannice

Recently, two seemingly unrelated, and perhaps insignificant, events in my life came together to teach me a valuable and inspirational lesson.

Event One – I read excerpts from the Roman philosopher Seneca’s 2,000-year-old discourse On the Shortness of Life.

Event Two – I meet 4 men biking from Alaska to Argentina and interviewed them for The Eye.

After nearly 9 months of biking, the team from Pedal South arrived in Huatulco, admittedly, a little behind schedule; four young men of ambition, determination and vision, 3 American and 1 Mexican. Two filmmakers, one photographer and one writer. Continue reading Pedal South