Tag Archives: Food & Dining

Land of the Maguey

By Julie Etra

Maguey or Agave comes from the Greek word Agavo, which means magnificent, noble, admirable. Other common names are pita, cabuya, fique, mescal, toba (in Zapotec) and ki (Maya). One of the 9 bays of Huatulco is named for this plant. They are abundant in the Mexican landscape and form a dominant portion of the vegetation in many parts of Mexico, especially in semi-arid regions. Distribution is from the Canadian-US border to Bolivia, including the Caribbean. The greatest diversity is in Mexico, home to 76% of the world’s population or 157 species of which 71% (111) are endemic, meaning they occur nowhere else. Fifty-two species occur in the state of Oaxaca. The origin of this group of plants dates to the Miocene or about 15 million years ago. They flower only once, after about 10-12 years and also reproduce vegetatively which is how they are generally cultivated. They have lifespan of about 25 years and are pollinated by bats and hummingbirds.  Continue reading Land of the Maguey

Edible Bugs

Screen Shot 2015-10-26 at 6.00.55 PMBy Alvin Starkman, M.A., J.D.

Prepared chapulines, or grasshoppers, are one of the most popular snack foods in the state of Oaxaca. Although they are available year round they are best eaten, during the summer and autumn months when crops and grasses are tall as a result of the rains, thus providing ample nourishment for the insect. Continue reading Edible Bugs

A Taste of Honey

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By Kathy Taylor

If you were inclined to subscribe to a “100 mile” diet, Huatulco is a pretty good place to live: all the fish and shrimp you can eat, shade grown coffee, mescal, fresh cheeses, sun-ripened fruits and vegetables, stone ground corn for tender tortillas, and of course, honey. Bees are what make the agricultural world go round. The relationship between bees and flowers is much like the conundrum of the chicken and the egg. Which came first?  Continue reading A Taste of Honey

Chopped Salad with Honey Lime Vinaigrette Dressing

  •  2 ½ cups chopped romaine lettuce
  • 1 ½ cups black beans (if canned, rinse before using)
  • 3/4 cup chopped seeded tomato
  • 3/4 cup chopped peeled jicama
  • 3/4 cup fresh corn kernels, uncooked (or frozen or canned)
  • 3/4 cup thinly sliced radishes
  • Half a ripe avocado, diced
  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped
  • ¼ cup crumbled cotija or feta cheese

Honey-Lime Dressing

  • 1/4 cup fresh lime juice
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • 2 tbsp finely chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled and minced
  • 1 tsp chopped jalapeño pepper (use canned for less heat)

Toss all salad ingredients in a large bowl. In separate bowl, mix dressing ingredients. Pour dressing over mixture and toss again. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Mico-lógica Alters our Perception of the Magic of Mushrooms in Oaxaca

Screen Shot 2015-11-05 at 6.08.16 PMAlvin Starkman, M.A., J.D.

When we think of mushrooms and Oaxaca the first thing which comes to mind is María Sabina, Huautla de Jiménez, and hallucinogenic “magic” mushrooms. But slowly that’s all changing as a result of the groundbreaking work in mycology of Josefina Jiménez and Johann Mathieu, through their company Mico-lógica. Continue reading Mico-lógica Alters our Perception of the Magic of Mushrooms in Oaxaca

Passover

Screen Shot 2015-11-05 at 5.47.51 PMBy Marcia and Jan Chaiken

Around the time that most of Mexico is observing Semana Santa, the holy week leading up to Easter, the Jewish population of Mexico (over 60,000 people in 2010) is celebrating Passover, a joyous eight days on the Jewish calendar. Passover is the celebration of release of the Israelite nation from enslaved captivity in Egypt over 3000 years ago. Continue reading Passover

Tehuana Celebrations

Screen Shot 2015-11-05 at 5.44.07 PMBy Brooke Gazer

The Isthmus of Tehuántepec is about 200KM south of Huatulco. Women from this region, who are referred to as “Tehuanas”, hold several elaborate celebrations each year. We all like to dress up when attending an important event and these ladies are certainly no exception. The traditional formal costume of Tehuanas is among the most ornate and distinctive in Mexico. In fact Frida Kahlo, who had a flair for the dramatic, often favored this style. The two piece dresses are frequently made of dark velvet and are covered in a vivid motif of embroidered flowers. This ensemble is referred to as a “Traje de Gala” (party dress) and the elaborate hand work can take up to a year to complete. These works of art sell for as much as 20,000 pesos although less ornate examples are available. Since not everyone can afford to own a “Traje de Gala” it is possible to rent one for 1000- 1500 pesos. Continue reading Tehuana Celebrations

Yellow Chicken

By Julie Etra

The people I have spoken with are in 100% agreement that Mexican chickens are much more flavorful than chickens from the United States (can’t speak for Canada or Europe) and I have a hard time adjusting when I return, even with the ‘free-range’ organic versions. The skin is also a lot yellower than what I am used to; there is a lot of misinformation out there on why they are so much yellower than what we see up north. The yellowness is a result of carotenoids, organic pigments, being absorbed by the skin. Continue reading Yellow Chicken

The Food of Love

By Kathy Taylor

Valentine’s Day. Romance. Seduction. Amor….The very essence of seduction is to stimulate the five senses: sight, sound, feel, taste, and smell. Starting the evening with a beautifully laid table, flowers, candlelight, soft music, a hint of perfume, and time to enjoy it all. This is not the night to be slaving over the stove, chopping, mixing, stirring, it’s all about make-ahead, have ready in the fridge to pop into the oven so you can relax and enjoy the evening. If you want a big elaborate production, go out to your favourite restaurant and really put on the dog, but if you want to do it right at home, simple elegant luxury is what it’s all about. Continue reading The Food of Love